A single link to the first track to allow the export script to build the search page
  • Friday, June 17, 2016
  • 0706-000483 Poster 102 - EARLY SOCIAL TRANSITION IN PATIENTS WITH CHILDHOOD ONSET OF GENDER DYSPHORIA IS COMMONLY SEEN IN SAN DIEGO'S GENDER MANAGEMENT (GEM) CLINIC

    June 19, 2016 8:00 AM - June 19, 2016 6:00 PM

    • Maja Marinkovic, MD ;
    • Ron Newfield, MD

    Purpose

    There are ongoing discussions and controversy about the early social transition of pre-adolescents with childhood onset of gender dysphoria (COGD). While transitioning seems to alleviate anxiety, depression and behavioral problems in children with COGD, there is a concern that a child who wanted to revert back to their natal gender, may find it difficult to reverse the transition.  We present experience and data from our Gender Management (GeM) clinic in San Diego about the early transition.

    Materials and Methods

    This is a longitudinal, prospective, observational study. Data collection included patients who attended the GeM clinic from 10/2011 to 12/2015. All subjects were consented and assented into IRB approved clinical database.

    Results

    During the research period 94 patients were consented into database and most have been followed prospectively. Within this group, 10 patients (5 natal females, 5 natal males) presented to our clinic at Tanner stage 1 or 2, at pre or early pubertal stage. The average age at their initial visit to our clinic was 8.3 years (range 5.1-12.3y). All these patients had previously been seen by a mental health provider who established the diagnosis of gender dysphoria. In all the cases, the family made the social transition prior to coming to the GeM clinic - first at home and afterwards in school. Several parents reported behavioral problems, anxiety, and possibly mild depression prior to social transition that since resolved. None of the children had a diagnosis of depression or autism, but three had ADHD. Six out of these 10 patients had their name and/or gender mark changed or are in the process of changing to a preferred one. For six children prospective data is available: they were seen 1 year after the transition or have been followed for 1-3 years and all continued to do well.

    Conclusion

    Close to 10% of patients in our Gender Management clinic presented at prepubertal or early pubertal stage. All of these families made social transition prior to the first visit to our clinic. Due to lack of long term follow up, based on this data, it is too early to conclude that early social transition is beneficial to all children with COGD. However, these young patients from the GeM clinic seem well adjusted and without mental health problems related to gender dysphoria.

    The limitations of the study are small number of patients and lack of long term follow up that extends into post-puberty, however since data in this field is sparse, our study contributes to the body of knowledge in this area of transgender care.


    Category: Pediatrics and Adolescent Health